Archive for the ‘Skills Gap’ Category

PRNewswire, Sept. 17, 2014

Udemy Skills Gap InfographicSixty-one percent of Americans believe that today’s workforce is plagued by a skills gap, but do not see themselves as part of the problem, according to new data released today. The Udemy Skills Gap Index, an independent survey commissioned by Udemy, the leading global marketplace for learning and teaching online, and conducted by ResearchNow, surveyed 1,000 Americans between the ages of 18 and 65. The survey polled consumers to determine their thoughts, perceptions and attitudes toward not only the skills they believe they possess, but also how these skills impact their professional lives. The resulting data revealed that despite a perception among American workers that a skills gap exists, 95 percent consider themselves to be either qualified or overqualified for the positions that they personally hold.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140916/146619-INFO

The “skills gap” refers to a disparity between the skills Americans have and those employers are seeking. The revelation that most Americans do not believe the skills gap applies to them adds new dimension to ManpowerGroup’s recent “Talent Shortage Survey,” which indicated 40 percent of U.S. employers report difficulty in filling vacant positions with qualified employees. Additionally, despite California’s status as a global leader in technology and innovation, the survey also uncovers new insight into how workers in the tech capital of the world feel about their tech skills -or lack thereof.

The Udemy Skills Gap Index uncovered key findings into mindsets of American workers, including:

A Gender Disconnect – A measurable gender disconnect in perceptions of the skills gap exists, with 68 percent of men believing in its existence as compared to 55 percent of women.

The Role of Higher Ed – While almost half of Americans say their higher education helped them get their first job, more than a third believe they use less than 10 percent of what they learned in college in the workplace.

A Generation Gap – A majority of millennials (53 percent) feel that they have already mastered the skills their jobs require of them, as compared to 43 percent of baby boomers.

Job Seeker Motivation – Thirty-six percent of people seeking a new job report taking no extra action (such as taking an online course, attending networking events or visiting a recruiter) to boost their chances of getting hired.

“These findings indicate that despite a widespread recognition that the skills gap exists, American employees share an ‘It’s not me, it’s you” mentality,” said Dennis Yang, CEO of Udemy. “The data also shows that while higher education may be effective at helping individuals score their first job, skills and knowledge learned at academic institutions become obsolete as Americans change professions and skill-set requirements change. We’re beginning to see workers take ownership of their own skill-set development with particular emphasis on developing technology skills, but in today’s competitive economic climate, it’s simply not enough.”

The survey also reveals that California’s residents are insecure when it comes to confidence in their own technology skills, especially surprising given that California is the established technological hub of the country:

Nearly one in three Californians (32 percent) cite tech skills as their biggest on-the-job weakness.

A majority of Californians (59 percent) who lost out on a job or promotion identify lacking tech skills as their main problem.

Forty-five percent of Californians admit to lying about their experience and skillsets on resumes, LinkedIn profiles and in interviews.

“New technology is raising the bar for success in the workplace. A majority of survey respondents say they need new skills to do their jobs, most often new technical skills. In today’s rapidly changing environment, new skills are needed to get jobs, promotions and higher compensation.” said economist James Bessen of Boston University.

To download a complete set of survey results and an analysis of the findings, please visit http://press.udemy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Udemy-Skills-Gap-Report-09162014.pdf

About Udemy
Udemy is the leading marketplace for online learning, offering people everywhere the opportunity to advance their careers, change professions, develop their personal passions or simply learn something new.

hol news iconBusinesses Must Align with Schools to Close “Skills Gap”
Denver Post, July 6, 2014
by Howard Pankratz

Click here for a printable version

 

Poor alignment of American businesses with the schools that train their workers is creating a “skills gap” that may make it hard to fill as many as 650,000 technical- and science-based jobs by 2018.

The country needs a shift in how industry and educational institutions relate to each other, economists and business executives say.

“We do not take an approach — either at the national level or state level – that creates an ease of communications between employers and educational institutions that are going to impart skills and background to potential employees,” said Joe Fuller, a Harvard Business School professor and faculty member of the school’s U.S. Competitiveness Project. “This is why we have 12 million to 13 million unemployed people and 650,000 job openings in manufacturing right now.”

Recent college graduates typically have only about half the skills they need in the workplace, according to John Miller, chief operating officer for Denver-based consulting firm Hands-On Learning.

This forces businesses struggling to find qualified employees — in areas such as computers, mathematics, architecture, engineering, management and health care — to educate workers in-house, which is costly.

“We really need to have universities run as businesses,” said Miller, whose company helps universities develop workforce programs. “It begins with the understanding that what they deliver to the market is a commodity: that’s a graduate.”

Since not all students can — or want to — go on to college, the American education system must provide alternatives.

Fuller, who is studying how the skills gap relates to boosting U.S. business competitiveness, estimates that 35 percent of people go to college today, compared with 5 percent in 1940.

“We’ve made a lot of progress, but the notion that 35 percent is going to 100 percent ever, let alone soon, is plain crazy,” said Fuller.

Most people will be trained for work that requires “middle skills” or “low skills” — jobs requiring more than a high school education but less than a four-year college degree, he said.

Aligning Education and Employment

(The Denver Post)

“I’m not saying we should be a nation of shopkeepers,” he said, adding there are areas besides advanced manufacturing jobs and computer scientists that need attention.

Fuller said many technical and professional schools are not nimble in upgrading curriculum to compete in the changing business world, and U.S. employers often lack effective workforce planning.

Fuller has studied how western European countries fill jobs.

Some of those countries track and test children from their early years to their teenage years, steering them into lifetime occupations for which they are deemed suited.

Fuller and Miller say such tracking would be alien to U.S. culture.

But Fuller says the educators must start talking to kids and their parents at a young age about what the children would like to do and coordinate that with business.

“What we can draw (from the European experience) is to have that dialogue early to allow families to think about what their kids are actually interested in doing and having an aptitude for,” Fuller said.

Fuller said a big issue is the lack of counseling for children and their families and mid-career counseling for people who are out of work.

“We under-invest in that capability in our school systems and in our departments of labor in different states,” he said.

Navin Dimond, CEO of Stonebridge Companies, an Englewood-based hotel manager, sees a problem with an education system that presumes all students will head to college after high school.

Dimond, who recently donated $1.5 million to Metropolitan State University of Denver’s hotel management program, said students should have a variety of educational opportunities from which to choose.

Some students may need only high school plus a few years of vocational or trade school. Others may want an apprenticeship during high school.

“I don’t think everyone wants the four-year education,” said Dimond, whose company owns and operates dozens of hotels in the U.S.

Hands-On’s Miller said the fortunes of business and universities might also be linked by developing programs for mid-career workers.

Rising costs are keeping many out of college, Miller said, and dwindling enrollment threatens the economic viability of some universities. To survive, he said, universities have to change how they operate.

Private industry, he said, could pick up some of the tab through partner programs that allow workers to advance their education while remaining employed.

“At the end of the day, industry is going to win, and it is going to lower the cost of operation if they do it effectively,” Miller said. ” The schools will then migrate to a new revenue model by working with industry.”