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PRNewswire, Sept. 17, 2014

Udemy Skills Gap InfographicSixty-one percent of Americans believe that today’s workforce is plagued by a skills gap, but do not see themselves as part of the problem, according to new data released today. The Udemy Skills Gap Index, an independent survey commissioned by Udemy, the leading global marketplace for learning and teaching online, and conducted by ResearchNow, surveyed 1,000 Americans between the ages of 18 and 65. The survey polled consumers to determine their thoughts, perceptions and attitudes toward not only the skills they believe they possess, but also how these skills impact their professional lives. The resulting data revealed that despite a perception among American workers that a skills gap exists, 95 percent consider themselves to be either qualified or overqualified for the positions that they personally hold.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140916/146619-INFO

The “skills gap” refers to a disparity between the skills Americans have and those employers are seeking. The revelation that most Americans do not believe the skills gap applies to them adds new dimension to ManpowerGroup’s recent “Talent Shortage Survey,” which indicated 40 percent of U.S. employers report difficulty in filling vacant positions with qualified employees. Additionally, despite California’s status as a global leader in technology and innovation, the survey also uncovers new insight into how workers in the tech capital of the world feel about their tech skills -or lack thereof.

The Udemy Skills Gap Index uncovered key findings into mindsets of American workers, including:

A Gender Disconnect – A measurable gender disconnect in perceptions of the skills gap exists, with 68 percent of men believing in its existence as compared to 55 percent of women.

The Role of Higher Ed – While almost half of Americans say their higher education helped them get their first job, more than a third believe they use less than 10 percent of what they learned in college in the workplace.

A Generation Gap – A majority of millennials (53 percent) feel that they have already mastered the skills their jobs require of them, as compared to 43 percent of baby boomers.

Job Seeker Motivation – Thirty-six percent of people seeking a new job report taking no extra action (such as taking an online course, attending networking events or visiting a recruiter) to boost their chances of getting hired.

“These findings indicate that despite a widespread recognition that the skills gap exists, American employees share an ‘It’s not me, it’s you” mentality,” said Dennis Yang, CEO of Udemy. “The data also shows that while higher education may be effective at helping individuals score their first job, skills and knowledge learned at academic institutions become obsolete as Americans change professions and skill-set requirements change. We’re beginning to see workers take ownership of their own skill-set development with particular emphasis on developing technology skills, but in today’s competitive economic climate, it’s simply not enough.”

The survey also reveals that California’s residents are insecure when it comes to confidence in their own technology skills, especially surprising given that California is the established technological hub of the country:

Nearly one in three Californians (32 percent) cite tech skills as their biggest on-the-job weakness.

A majority of Californians (59 percent) who lost out on a job or promotion identify lacking tech skills as their main problem.

Forty-five percent of Californians admit to lying about their experience and skillsets on resumes, LinkedIn profiles and in interviews.

“New technology is raising the bar for success in the workplace. A majority of survey respondents say they need new skills to do their jobs, most often new technical skills. In today’s rapidly changing environment, new skills are needed to get jobs, promotions and higher compensation.” said economist James Bessen of Boston University.

To download a complete set of survey results and an analysis of the findings, please visit http://press.udemy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Udemy-Skills-Gap-Report-09162014.pdf

About Udemy
Udemy is the leading marketplace for online learning, offering people everywhere the opportunity to advance their careers, change professions, develop their personal passions or simply learn something new.

One Million by One Million Blog, August 27-28, 2014

There is a huge gap between industry and academia today. Learn more about the lay of the land and identify opportunities for entrepreneurship.

Sramana Mitra: Let’s start with giving our audience a bit of context about Hands-On Learning (HOL). What do you do? What major online education industry trends are you aligning with?

John Miller: I’m the Managing Partner and Chief Operating Officer of HOL. We’re a distance learning technology and consulting company that is focused on aligning education and private industry for effective workforce development, specifically in the STEM disciplines. In my role, I’m focusing on both sides of the fence, but we have an initiative that targets bringing industry and education together to focus on those STEM-related fields. We have about 14 years of experience working with universities and hundred thousand students. We have a pretty good perspective on education and what it takes to affect distance learning as a delivery vehicle.

Sramana Mitra: Who are your clients?

John Miller: From the HOL product solutions, we have a thousand universities today and a couple of hundred thousand students that are utilizing our solutions. In the area of the STEM initiative, we’re focusing on a dozen universities in North America building this unique relationship between the university and private industry. Historically, the relationship between those two entities has been limited in scope to grants and endowments. What we’re endeavoring to do is initiate a meaningful partnership between those two parties.

If you talk to the educational groups and look at their perspective on a graduating student, how much of the skill set required to enter the workforce do they really have? The answer you get is typically 70%. From the industry side, their perspective is closer to 50%. There’s a major gap and they both agree that there’s a gap.

I can only speak of one because we’re under non-disclosure agreements (NDA), and NDA with most but one has become public. That is a partnership between Cal State and Kaiser Permanente. Their focus is on educating their nursing community. We’re working with them to essentially identify where the gap lies and how can it be bridged, and taking their existing workforce and bringing them back to the educational process, so they can continue to grow through the career path of nursing.

Sramana Mitra: Where is the gap? What are you learning in this process?

John Miller: A lot of it is around competency-based education. One of the big areas that have been a challenge for education is providing the clinical experience of effectively bridging some of those skill gaps. Partnering these two groups together helps facilitate that but it goes a wide stream. We can identify a lot of different areas.

A case example is that the primary tool that a nurse uses in her role revolves around electronic medical record systems. I don’t know of any school that is actually conducting training with that primary tool. We do an assessment on both sides. On the education side, we look at their capabilities and the content and competencies they have relating to that. We can identify a number of gaps in that area. It’s all over the place but competency-based education seems to be the solution that is most viable here.

Sramana Mitra: Then what do you do to fill those gaps? Do you develop content modules to be delivered over the Internet around those skill gap areas?

John Miller: What we are in the process of doing with our clients is identifying the gaps and then, building a goal alignment. We go through a very detailed assessment on both sides. We try to identify what lines of business in their arena are changing, and what are the talent requirements that are going to be needed going forward.

One of the areas that we found in healthcare is that there’s a shift away from the hospital and the clinic, and moving into home healthcare as a direct fulfillment of this bubble that the baby boomers are bringing in. It was just unbelievable. Honestly, we’re going to need somewhere between three and five times the amount of skilled nursing in three to five years. We can see that this is forthcoming. Yet there wasn’t an initiative through education or between industry and education to really start to make that happen. In fact, we’ve found that a lot of universities were discouraging people going into nursing, because there isn’t a significant demand at the current moment when in fact, in a relatively short period of time, there’s going to be a huge need.

It’s really finding these issues and doing alignment. What are the skills? What are the talents that are going to be required?

Sramana Mitra: What you just mentioned is not just skill training. That is a question of communicating with the educational institution on what professions the career development office should guide the students towards.

John Miller:Yes, absolutely. As you go down this path, the missing link is education does not know the next generation or the next strategic move by a lot of these industries they serve. Through this process, we’re building a strategic alliance between industry and education so they can identify what are the skills and talent requirements going forward so education can impact that. All of the STEM challenge-related initiatives are really focused at K-12. We’re one of the very different, or at least one of the few, that are really focused on today’s workforce.

When we sit down and go through this with an industry, what we’re finding is that they have a huge number of existing employees who want to go back to school. Honestly, what we’re providing now is a new tool for education to engage that body of new students that’ll be coming back in. Kaiser is talking about 40,000 employees who’ll come back into that process.

Click here for a printable version of the story.

 

NBC News, July 9, 2014

Those math and science degrees pay off after college — humanities, not so much. A survey of the class of 2008, released by the National Center for Education Statistics, provides an interesting snapshot of the nation’s educated elite following a crushing economic recession. College grads from private four-year schools earned about the same as those from public four-year schools, about $50,000 a year. But while a paltry 16 percent of students took home degrees in science, technology, engineering or math — so-called STEM disciplines — those who did were paid significantly better. They averaged $65,000 a year compared with $49,500 for graduates with other degrees. The findings are based on a survey of 17,110 students in 2012, about four years after they received bachelor’s degrees. The survey found a strong correlation between earning money and highly specialized degrees. More than 95 percent of grads who studied computer and information sciences were employed full time during the survey and earned $72,600 on average. Engineering students reported similar job and salary prospects. Meanwhile, a humanities graduate was more likely to report working multiple jobs and earning a full-time salary averaging $43,100.

Click here for a printable version of the survey.